Eckart Marchand

Assistant Archivist

Eckart.Marchand@sas.ac.uk

iconology.hypotheses.org

 

Research Interests 
Italian Renaissance to eighteenth century art | Sculpture and its reproductions | Plaster casts | Workshop practices |  Materiality | John Flaxman and the Grand Tour | The representation of gestures in Italian Renaissance painting

 

Bio

Eckart Marchand studied History of Art at the Universities of Berlin, Bonn, and Basel, where he completed his PhD in 2000. He was Occasional Student at the Warburg Institute from 1993 to 1997 part-time lecturer at City University from 1995 to 2000. He also taught in the History of Art Department at UCL (1998-99, 2001-03), and was Director of the UCL History of Art Summer School (2003). From 2003 to 2007 he was Lecturer in Italian Renaissance Art at the University of Reading. He joined the Warburg Institute Archive in 2008 and was Acting Archivist in 2010/11. Eckart also contributed to the edition of Vol. III.1 (Lectures and Essays) of Aby Warburg's Gesammelte Schriften (forthcoming) and, since 2014, is presently a member of the Project ‘Bilderfahrzeuge: The Legacy of Aby Warburg and the Future of Iconology’.  

Further information on Eckart Marchand’s current research project

 

Research

For his doctorate, Eckart studied the representation of gestures in fifteenth-century paintings of saints, famous men and in portraiture, engaging with issues such as patronage, the status of the artist, requirements of devotional practices, and patterns of pictorial composition. This research has been published as "Gebärden in der Florentiner Malerei: Studien zur Charakterisierung von Heiligen, Uomini Famosi und Zeitgenossen im Quattrocento" (Münster 2004). 

Eckart has published a number of articles on the workshop practice of the British Neoclassical sculptor John Flaxman (1755-1826) and UCL’s Flaxman gallery and edited several of Flaxman’s journals and sketchbooks from his trip to Italy (1787-93) for the 2010 volume of the Walpole Society.

Presently he is working on the use of plaster casts in artists’ workshops from 1400 to ca. 1800, looking at Renaissance Italy, seventeenth and eighteenth-century France (with a particular interest in the role of the Bâtiments du Roi), and at British late eighteenth century sculptors in the context of the Grand Tour.

 

Publications

Books:

Gebärden in der Florentiner Malerei. Studien zur Charakterisierung von Heiligen, Uomini Famosi und

Zeitgenossen im Quattrocento, Lit Verlag, Münster 2004

Co-authored volumes:

H. Brigstocke, E. Marchand and A. E. Wright, John Flaxman and William Young Ottley in Italy, (Walpole Society 72 (2010))

Edited volumes:

Rune Frederiksen and Eckart Marchand (eds), Plaster Casts: making, collecting and display, (Transformationen der Antike, 18) Berlin 2010

Eckart Marchand and Alison Wright (eds), With and Without the Medici: Studies in Tuscan Art and Patronage, 1434-1530, Ashgate Publishers, Aldershot 1998

Articles

‘Image and Thing: The distribution and impact of plaster casts in Renaissance Europe’, invited contribution to  International connections: Renaissance sculptors and their impact abroad, Sculpture Journal 26/1 (2017), 83-91

‘The Flaxman Gallery and the Rôle of Plaster Casts in the Workshop of John Flaxman 1755-1826’ in: M. Guderzo, ed., Il Valore del Gesso: Modello, Calco, Copia per la Realizzazione della Scultura, Possagno 2017, 311- 322

‘Artist and Grand Tourist: John Flaxman’s Italian Journals and Sketchbooks’ in T. Macsotay, ed., Antiquity Multiplied. Rome as a European Sculpture Workshop (1770-1820), Aldershot 2017, pp.179-95

‘Material Distinctions: Plaster, Terracotta, and Wax in the Renaissance artist’s workshop’  in C. Anderson, A. Dunlop and P. Smith, eds, The Matter of Art: Materials, Practices, Cultural Logics, c. 1250-1750, Manchester 2014, pp. 160-179

‘His Master’s Voice: Painted Inscriptions in the Work of Domenico Ghirlandaio’, Artibus et historiae, 66, 2012, pp. 99-120

‘Reproducing Relief: The Use and Status of Plaster Casts in the Italian Renaissance’ in D. Cooper, M. Leino, eds, Depth of Field: Relief Sculpture in Renaissance Italy, Peter Lang, Oxford, Bern, and elsewhere, 2007 pp. 191-222