Lectures

Word and Image in Times of Crisis

A series of events, 18 to 21 February 2019, The Warburg Institute, Lecture Room:

Reading Group: Aby Warburg, Pagan-Antique Prophecies in Words and Images in the Age of Luther

Jane Newman, Warburg on Luther and Dürer: Media Wars and the Freedom to Think

Display of Materials relating to Aby Warburg’s work on early modern prints and the media of his time (Introduction by Steffen Haug and Claudia Wedepohl)

Roundtable Discussion: Word and Image in times of Crisis

18, 20 & 21 February 2019

Find out more

 

Labour Recruitment, Taxation and Location: Mapping (and Failing to Map) Mobile Populations in Early Twentieth Century Southern Africa.

Presented by Dr Elizabeth Haines (Department of History, University of Bristol).

Lectures in the history of cartography convened by Catherine Delano-Smith (Institute of Historical Research, University of London), Tony Campbell (formerly Map Library, British Library), Peter Barber (Visiting Fellow, History, King’s College, formerly Map Library, British Library) and Alessandro Scafi (Warburg Institute). 

28 February 2019, 5.00pm - 6.30pm​ 

No registration required - all welcome.

 

 

21st Century Digital Approaches to Rethinking 19th Century American Catholic Libraries

Presented by Kyle Roberts (Loyola University, Chicago).

Digital platforms, sources, and tools have changed the way we study libraries over the past few decades. The Jesuit Libraries Provenance Project at Loyola University Chicago is a collaborative digital research project that uses these digital affordances to write a new history of nineteenth-century American Catholic libraries and, in so doing, rethink American Catholicism. 

5 March 2019, 5.30pm - 7.30pm

No registration required- all welcome

 

 

 

Image Economies:  Material Witness and Dematerialized Image - the Sixteenth-Century Siege Coin, Post-Siege

Presented by Dr Allison Stielau, UCL

As money seemingly grows ever more immaterial and threatens to vanish from sight entirely, the visual aspect of economics becomes more important if we are to avoid overlooking the obscure forces that rule our lives. This series asks: how does money look and what are its material qualities? And what happens when images themselves take on some of the qualities of money, becoming stores of value or circulating as media of exchange? This lecture is the first in a three part series on Image Economies. Organised by Tom Wilkinson, Leverhulme Early Career Fellow.

6 March 2019, 5.30pm - 7.30pm

Book now

 

Curatorial Conversations: Exchanging Glances: The Challenges of Cross-Cultural Exhibitions

Presented by Dr Melanie Holcomb, Curator in the Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Part of Curatorial Conversations; a series of lectures which invites curators from around the world to share their knowledge and experience.

Melanie Holcomb oversees the Metropolitan Museum of Art's collection of early medieval art. In conversation with Michelle O’Malley, Deputy Director, she will discuss the questions and issues entangled in exhibiting material from a variety of cultures and times, and reflect on how objects both engender connections and resist easy associations. 

12 March 2019, 5.30pm - 7.30pm

Book now

 

Image Economies: Promissory Notes of Architecture

Presented by Professor Claire Zimmerman, University of Michigan.​

Until the emergence of digital processes, the image of architecture (built or unbuilt) functioned like a promissory note for architecture yet to come. The image offered an experience that did not yet exist—even in the case of professionally photographed works that made an art of selective editing. In this schema, the image promised an incipient reality, and it inspired subsequent producers to emulate the process of imaging that which they wanted to build “on the ground.” Since the advent of digital imaging, many have pointed to the disappearance of this intermediate stage, along with the image itself.

13 March 2019, 5.30pm - 7.30pm

Book now

 

 

Paintings in Exile: the Wanderings of French Art in the Americas, 1939-1947

Speaker: Dr Victor Claass (Sorbonne University – Louvre Museum, Paris). 

15 March 2019, 5.30pm - 7.00pm

Book now

 

 

 

 

Image Economies: Ink on Paper - A Material History of Financial Risk

Presented by Professor Maggie Cao, University of North Carolina.

In 2008, many of us experienced the financial crisis as a steady stream of electronic data—the medium of economic transactions today. This paper examines the material history of financial risk by returning to the first stock market crash, the South Sea Bubble of 1720. In this era of ink on paper, the material artefacts associated with exchange and speculation—bills, receipts, stock tickets, and other mercantile paperwork—became the subject of trompe l’oeil drawings and prints. 

20 March 2019, 5.30pm - 7.30pm

Book now

 

The Rise of Monumental Maps in America: Aesthetics, Technology, and Material Culture

Presented by Professor Martin Brueckner (English Department and Centre for Material Culture Studies, University of Delaware).

Lectures in the history of cartography convened by Catherine Delano-Smith (Institute of Historical Research, University of London), Tony Campbell (formerly Map Library, British Library), Peter Barber (Visiting Fellow, History, King’s College, formerly Map Library, British Library) and Alessandro Scafi (Warburg Institute). 

21 March 2019, 5.00pm - 6.30pm

No registration required - all welcome.

 

 

 

The Publisher, the Architect and the Sculptor: The Building of Fountainbridge Library, Edinburgh

Presented by Alice Strang , Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh

This icon of modern Scottish architecture opened in 1940. Funded by the publisher Thomas Nelson Jnr, designed by the architect John A. W. Grant, and with friezes on its façade by the sculptor Charles d’Orville Pilkington Jackson, Fountainbridge Library was a purpose-built, state-of-the-art library and community hall which embodied the most far-sighted concerns of architects, librarians and social policy makers of the inter-war period. 

2 April 2019, 5.30pm - 7.30pm

find out more

 

warburg

A Medium of Sustenance: Photographs and Exhibition Practice at the Warburg Institute 1933-45

Speaker: Dr Johannes von Müller (Bilderfahrzeuge Project, London)

3 May 2019, 5.30pm - 7pm

Book here

 

 

 

‘Working tools almost daily in demand’: The Libraries of John Nichols and His Family

Presented by Julian Pooley, Surrey Museums, Woking

The Nichols family lived and breathed books. They printed them, reviewed them, sold them, borrowed them and collected them. Writing his autobiography in 1850, the architectural historian, John Britton, paid tribute to the ‘Spacious printing office of my venerable and kind friend, John Nichols, who indulged me with the use of many books from his valuable topographical library, but none were to be taken away, for he justly saw them as his working tools almost in daily demand’.

7 May 2019, 5.30pm - 7.30pm

Find out more

 

 

Curatorial Conversations: Directing the Fitzwilliam

Luke Syson, Director of the Fitzwilliam Museum, in conversation with Michelle O'Malley, Deputy Director and Professor of the History of Art at the Warburg Institute.

Part of Curatorial Conversations; a series of lectures which invites curators from around the world to share their knowledge and experience.

6 June 2019, 5.30pm - 7.30pm

Book here

 

 

 

Gombrich Lectures

A series of lectures presented by Professor Kate Lowe, Professor of Renaissance History and Culture, and Co-director of the Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies (CREMS).

More information to follow. Free and open to all. 

18 - 20 June 2019, 5.30pm - 7.30pm

Book here